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Trend of ‘No-Tipping’ Restaurants Spreading Nationwide

No tipping restaurants are already the norm in other countries, but they're becoming more common in the United States

Do you think the trend toward no-tipping restaurants will become common in Michigan? (Patch file photo)
Do you think the trend toward no-tipping restaurants will become common in Michigan? (Patch file photo)

By Kara Seymour

Do you tip 20 percent or 15 percent? How about zero percent?

No tipping restaurants are already the norm in other countries, but they're becoming more common in the United States.

A new “no tipping” restaurant is opening in Philadelphia’s Fishtown neighborhood this fall. The restaurant, a French BYO named Girard, plans to pay its servers $11 an hour, offer health insurance, sick days and profit sharing, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

What diners save in tips however, they may spend on the cost of the meals. Menu prices would be 10 percent to 30 percent higher at Girard than at similar restaurants, the Inquirer reported.

The no-tipping movement seems to be gaining traction, especially among high-end establishments that opt for a blanket service surcharge over an optional offering.

Restaurants from coast to coast have banned tipping, including in New York, California and Washington D.C.

Tell Us:

  • Do you have a no-tipping restaurant in your neighborhood? What do you think of the concept?

Some go so far as to give the tips back or donate bills left on the tables to charity. The Public Option Brewery in Washington D.C. pays workers $15 and gives any money left on the tables to charity, according to CBS News.

Scott Rosenberg, who owns a no-tipping restaurant in New York, told Market Watch that eliminating gratuity makes the conclusion of the meal more enjoyable and comfortable for customers, who don’t have to judge the service and do the math based on their satisfaction.

“The meal should be there for you to enjoy without doing this calculus,” Rosenberg said.
Hope Steinke Hughes June 24, 2014 at 11:57 AM
When I was in Germany and Austria, we were told not to tip. You could pay your Bill up to the next dollar, but no more than that.
Diane Cliff June 25, 2014 at 08:27 AM
No tipping in Japan, either.
MaryLynn Bertetto June 25, 2014 at 10:51 AM
One tips in Germany. Lived there 10 years. It was more like 5% tho.
RON Ostrodamus June 25, 2014 at 07:01 PM
You can be assured the waitstaff receives a fair wage. I know that in Poland these jobs are intentionally reserved for students despite high unemployment that does not seem fair for those who have a family to support. Personally, I feel that if the server's service and attitude are substandard I will leave just one dollar. No excuse for bad service, or wisecracks from waitstaff such as "the coffee was just brewed" when you get a lukewarm obviously stale cup.

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